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The Hobbit Screenplay PDF: What You Can Learn and Enjoy from Reading the Scripts



Outline of the article ----------------------- H1: Hobbit Screenplay PDF: How to Download and Read the Scripts of the Epic Fantasy Trilogy H2: Introduction H3: What is The Hobbit trilogy and why is it worth reading? H3: Where can you find the hobbit screenplay pdf files online? H2: The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Screenplay H3: The plot summary of the first film H3: The main characters and their roles H3: The highlights and challenges of adapting the novel H2: The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Screenplay H3: The plot summary of the second film H3: The new characters and locations introduced H3: The changes and additions made to the original story H2: The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies Screenplay H3: The plot summary of the third film H3: The climax and resolution of the trilogy H3: The connections and references to The Lord of the Rings films H2: Conclusion H3: The main themes and messages of The Hobbit trilogy H3: The reception and legacy of the films H3: The benefits and drawbacks of reading the hobbit screenplay pdf files --- # Hobbit Screenplay PDF: How to Download and Read the Scripts of the Epic Fantasy Trilogy ## Introduction If you are a fan of fantasy literature and cinema, you have probably heard of or watched The Hobbit trilogy, a series of three high-fantasy adventure films directed by Peter Jackson. The three films are subtitled An Unexpected Journey (2012), The Desolation of Smaug (2013), and The Battle of the Five Armies (2014). They are all based on the 1937 novel The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien, who also wrote the famous sequel, The Lord of the Rings. The Hobbit trilogy tells the story of Bilbo Baggins, a hobbit who joins a company of thirteen dwarves and a wizard named Gandalf on a quest to reclaim their ancestral home, Erebor, from a fearsome dragon named Smaug. Along the way, they encounter many dangers and wonders, such as trolls, goblins, elves, spiders, giant eagles, shape-shifters, orcs, wargs, and a mysterious creature called Gollum, who possesses a powerful ring that will play a crucial role in the future events of Middle-earth. The Hobbit trilogy is a remarkable achievement in filmmaking, as it combines stunning visual effects, elaborate sets and costumes, epic music, and talented actors to bring Tolkien's world to life. It also expands on the original novel by adding new scenes and characters, some of which are drawn from Tolkien's other writings or invented by Jackson and his co-writers. While some fans and critics have praised these changes for adding depth and complexity to the story, others have criticized them for deviating from Tolkien's vision or being unnecessary. Whether you love or hate these changes, there is no doubt that reading the hobbit screenplay pdf files can give you a new perspective on the films and their creative process. You can learn how the writers adapted the novel into three scripts, how they structured the plot and developed the characters, how they wrote the dialogue and described the action, how they incorporated Tolkien's language and lore, and how they revised their drafts based on feedback and production issues. But where can you find these hobbit screenplay pdf files online? And how can you download and read them easily? In this article, we will answer these questions and provide you with some tips on how to enjoy and learn from these scripts. ## Where can you find the hobbit screenplay pdf files online? There are several websites that offer free access to various screenplays, including those of The Hobbit trilogy. Some of these websites are: - [The Scripted Edit](https://thescriptededit.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/the-hobbit-an-unexpected-journey-scripted-edit-ee1.pdf): This website provides an edited version of the screenplay for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (Extended Edition), which removes some scenes that were not in the theatrical release and adds some scenes that were in the novel but not in the film. It also includes some notes and comments by the editor, who explains the reasons for the changes and compares them to the novel and the film. This is a useful resource for fans who want to see how the first film could have been different or closer to the source material. - [Bulletproof Screenwriting](https://bulletproofscreenwriting.tv/lord-of-the-rings-hobbit-screenplay-download/): This website provides a collection of screenplays for both The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings trilogies, as well as some other films by Peter Jackson. You can download the screenplays for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, and The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies as pdf files. These are the official screenplays that were written by Jackson and his co-writers, Philippa Boyens, Fran Walsh, and Guillermo del Toro. They also include some annotations and illustrations that show the concept art and storyboards for some scenes. These are valuable resources for fans who want to see how the films were planned and executed by the filmmakers. - [No Film School](https://nofilmschool.com/hobbit-trilogy-screenplay-downloads): This website provides links to download the transcripts for The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug and The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies. These are not the original screenplays, but rather the transcripts of what was said and done in the films. They are useful for fans who want to check or quote some lines or details from the films, but they do not show the creative process behind them. ## The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Screenplay The screenplay for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey is divided into 15 sequences, each with a title and a number of scenes. The sequences are: - Sequence 1: Prologue - An Unexpected Party - Sequence 2: Roast Mutton - Sequence 3: A Short Rest - Sequence 4: Over Hill - Sequence 5: Under Hill - Sequence 6: Out of the Frying-Pan - Sequence 7: Queer Lodgings - Sequence 8: Flies and Spiders - Sequence 9: Barrels Out of Bond - Sequence 10: A Warm Welcome - Sequence 11: On the Doorstep - Sequence 12: Inside Information - Sequence 13: Not at Home - Sequence 14: Fire and Water - Sequence 15: The Gathering of the Clouds The screenplay follows the main events of the novel, but also adds some new scenes and characters that are not in the book. Some of these additions are: - A flashback to Erebor before its fall, showing how Thorin earned his nickname "Oakenshield" and how he escaped from Smaug's attack. - A scene where Gandalf meets with Radagast, another wizard who tells him about a dark force rising in Dol Guldur, an abandoned fortress in Mirkwood forest. - A scene where Gandalf, Bilbo, and the dwarves encounter Azog, an orc chieftain who has a personal grudge against Thorin and pursues them throughout their journey. - A scene where Gandalf visits Dol Guldur and discovers that it is inhabited by a mysterious enemy known as "the Necromancer". - A scene where Bilbo finds the Arkenstone, a precious gem that is the heart of Erebor and a symbol of Thorin's kingship. The screenplay also makes some changes to the original story, such as: - Making Bilbo more reluctant and doubtful about joining the quest, until he proves himself by saving Thorin from Azog. - Making Thorin more proud and stubborn, until he learns to respect Bilbo and trust his companions. - Making Gandalf more secretive and mysterious, until he reveals his true motives and intentions. - Making Radagast more eccentric and comical, until he shows his courage and skill. - Making Azog more menacing and powerful, until he meets his fate at the hands of Thorin. The screenplay also uses some elements from Tolkien's other writings, such as: - The appendices of The Lord of the Rings, which provide some background information on the history and geography of Middle-earth, as well as some details on the characters and events of The Hobbit. - The Silmarillion, which contains some myths and legends of Middle-earth, as well as some references to ancient beings and powers that influence the story of The Hobbit. - Unfinished Tales, which contains some stories and essays that expand on some aspects of Tolkien's world, such as the nature and origin of wizards, dragons, orcs, etc. The screenplay also creates some elements that are not in Tolkien's writings, such as: - The White Council, a group of wise beings that includes Gandalf, Saruman, Galadriel, and Elrond, who discuss the threat of the Necromancer and decide whether to act against him or not. - The stone giants, a race of colossal creatures that live in the Misty Mountains and hurl rocks at each other for fun. - The goblin king, a grotesque and tyrannical ruler of the goblins who captures the dwarves and tries to bargain with them. - The wargs, a breed of wolf-like creatures that serve as mounts and allies for the orcs. - The eagles, a noble and majestic race of giant birds that rescue Gandalf, Bilbo, and the dwarves from the orcs and wargs. The screenplay also uses some techniques and devices to enhance the storytelling, such as: - Voice-over narration by Bilbo, who introduces the story and comments on some events and characters. - Flashbacks and flash-forwards, which show some scenes from the past or the future that are relevant to the present situation. - Foreshadowing and hints, which suggest some outcomes or consequences that will happen later in the story. - Symbolism and imagery, which use some objects or actions to represent some ideas or themes. - Humor and irony, which add some lightness and contrast to the serious and dramatic tone of the story. The screenplay also follows some conventions and rules of screenwriting, such as: - The three-act structure, which divides the story into three parts: the setup, the confrontation, and the resolution. - The plot points, which are key events that move the story forward or change its direction. - The character arcs, which are the changes that the characters undergo throughout the story. - The dialogue, which is the spoken words of the characters that reveal their personality, emotions, motivations, etc. - The action, which is the physical movement and behavior of the characters that show their actions and reactions. The screenplay also aims to achieve some goals and purposes, such as: - Entertaining and engaging the audience with a thrilling and captivating story that appeals to their imagination and emotions. - Educating and informing the audience with a rich and detailed world that reflects Tolkien's vision and research. - Inspiring and influencing the audience with a meaningful and powerful message that resonates with their values and beliefs. ## The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Screenplay The screenplay for The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug is divided into 14 sequences, each with a title and a number of scenes. The sequences are: - Sequence 1: Prologue - Bree - Sequence 2: Beorn's House - Sequence 3: Mirkwood - Sequence 4: Thranduil's Halls - Sequence 5: Barrels Out of Bond - Sequence 6: Lake-town - Sequence 7: Dol Guldur - Sequence 8: Erebor - Sequence 9: Inside Information - Sequence 10: Not at Home - Sequence 11: Lake-town (Reprise) - Sequence 12: Dol Guldur (Reprise) - Sequence 13: Smaug's Attack - Sequence 14: The Gathering of the Clouds - A flashback to Thorin's meeting with Gandalf in Bree, where Gandalf convinces him to embark on the quest and gives him the key and the map to Erebor. - A scene where Gandalf leaves the company at the edge of Mirkwood and goes to investigate the tombs of the Nazgûl, the nine ringwraiths who serve the Dark Lord Sauron. - A scene where Bilbo and the dwarves encounter a giant spider named Ungoliant's Spawn, who is the offspring of an ancient evil that once allied with Morgoth, the first Dark Lord. - A scene where Legolas, an elf prince and son of Thranduil, and Tauriel, an elf warrior and captain of the guard, capture and interrogate an orc named Narzug, who reveals Azog's plan to attack Erebor. - A scene where Bard, a human archer and descendant of Girion, the last lord of Dale, smuggles Bilbo and the dwarves into Lake-town with the help of his children Bain, Sigrid, and Tilda. - A scene where Kili, one of the dwarves, is wounded by a poisoned arrow shot by Bolg, Azog's son and lieutenant, and is healed by Tauriel with the aid of athelas, a healing herb also known as kingsfoil. - A scene where Gandalf enters Dol Guldur and confronts the Necromancer, who reveals himself to be Sauron in a fiery form. - A scene where Bilbo steals a cup from Smaug's treasure hoard and awakens the dragon, who chases him through the halls of Erebor. - A scene where Thorin and the other dwarves try to trap Smaug inside the Lonely Mountain by using an elaborate mechanism that involves forges, furnaces, molten gold, and a giant statue of a dwarf king. - A scene where Smaug escapes from Erebor and flies towards Lake-town, vowing to destroy it and its people. The screenplay also makes some changes to the original story, such as: - Making Bilbo more confident and courageous, until he becomes corrupted by the ring and lies to Thorin about finding the Arkenstone. - Making Thorin more greedy and paranoid, until he becomes obsessed with the Arkenstone and distrusts his friends and allies. - Making Gandalf more active and involved, until he becomes trapped and tortured by Sauron and his minions. - Making Legolas more skilled and agile, until he becomes conflicted between his duty to his father and his attraction to Tauriel. - Making Tauriel more independent and rebellious, until she becomes torn between her love for Kili and her loyalty to her people. - Making Bard more heroic and noble, until he becomes the leader of Lake-town and the slayer of Smaug. The screenplay also uses some elements from Tolkien's other writings, such as: - The appendices of The Lord of the Rings, which provide some background information on the history and geography of Middle-earth, as well as some details on the characters and events of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. - The Silmarillion, which contains some myths and legends of Middle-earth, as well as some references to ancient beings and powers that influence the story of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. - Unfinished Tales, which contains some stories and essays that expand on some aspects of Tolkien's world, such as the nature and origin of wizards, dragons, orcs, etc. The screenplay also creates some elements that are not in Tolkien's writings, such as: - The romance between Tauriel and Kili, which is a major subplot that affects the relationships and decisions of several characters. - The character of Alfrid, who is a cowardly and greedy servant of the Master of Lake-town, who opposes Bard and tries to escape with the town's gold. - The character of Thrain, who is Thorin's father and the former king of Erebor, who was captured by Sauron and lost his ring of power. - The character of Beorn, who is a skin-changer who can transform into a bear, who helps Gandalf and the company escape from the orcs and wargs. - The character of Bolg, who is Azog's son and lieutenant, who leads a large army of orcs to attack Erebor. The screenplay also uses some techniques and devices to enhance the storytelling, such as: - Voice-over narration by Bilbo, who continues to introduce the story and comment on some events and characters. - Flashbacks and flash-forwards, which show some scenes from the past or the future that are relevant to the present situation. - Foreshadowing and hints, which suggest some outcomes or consequences that will happen later in the story. - Symbolism and imagery, which use some objects or actions to represent some ideas or themes. - Humor and irony, which add some lightness and contrast to the serious and dramatic tone of the story. The screenplay also follows some conventions and rules of screenwriting, such as: - The three-act structure, which divides the story into three parts: the setup, the confrontation, and the resolution. - The plot points, which are key events that move the story forward or change its direction. - The character arcs, which are the changes that the characters undergo throughout the story. - The dialogue, which is the spoken words of the characters that reveal their personality, emotions, motivations, etc. - The action, which is the physical movement and behavior of the characters that show their actions and reactions. The screenplay also aims to achieve some goals and purposes, such as: - Entertaining and engaging the audience with a thrilling and captivating story that appeals to their imagination and emotions. - Educating and informing the audience with a rich and detailed world that reflects Tolkien's vision and research. - Inspiring and influencing the audience with a meaningful and powerful message that resonates with their values and beliefs. ## The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies Screenplay The screenplay for The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies is divided into 13 sequences, each with a title and a number of scenes. The sequences are: - Sequence 1: Prologue - Smaug's Attack - Sequence 2: Aftermath - Sequence 3: The Lonely Mountain - Sequence 4: Dol Guldur - Sequence 5: Lake-town - Sequence 6: Ravenhill - Sequence 7: The Battle of the Five Armies - Sequence 8: The Fate of the Company - Sequence 9: The Return Journey - Sequence 10: The Last Stage - Sequence 11: Epilogue - Bag End - Sequence 12: Credits - Sequence 13: Post-Credits Scene The screenplay concludes the main events of the novel, but also adds some new scenes and characters that are not in the book. Some of these additions are: - A scene where Smaug attacks Lake-town and is killed by Bard with a black arrow. - A scene where Thorin suffers from "dragon sickness", a madness caused by his greed for gold and the Arkenstone. - A scene where Bilbo tries to make peace between Thorin and Bard by giving Bard the Arkenstone as a bargaining chip. - A scene where Gandalf is rescued by Galadriel, Elrond, Saruman, and Radagast from Dol Guldur, where they also confront Sauron and his Nazgûl. - A scene where Legolas and Tauriel follow Bolg to Ravenhill, where they also encounter Thranduil and Dain Ironfoot, Thorin's cousin and ally. - A scene where Bilbo joins Thorin, Fili, Kili, Dwalin, and Balin on Ravenhill, where they face Azog and Bolg in a final showdown. - A scene where Thorin dies in Bilbo's arms after killing Azog, while Fili and Kili die protecting Tauriel from Bolg. - A scene where Bilbo bids farewell to Gandalf and the surviving dwarves before returning to the Shire with a chest of gold and silver. - A scene where Bilbo arrives at Bag End on his birthday and finds his belongings being auctioned off by his relatives. - A scene where Bilbo settles back into his home and writes his memoirs under the title "There and Back Again". - A scene where Bilbo receives a visit from Gandalf sixty years later, on the eve of his eleventy-first birthday. The screenplay also makes some changes to the original story, such as: - Making Bilbo more heroic and loyal, until he risks his life to save Thorin and his friends from their enemies. - Making Thorin more tragic and redeemable, until he overcomes his madness and sacrifices himself for his people. - Making Gandalf more wise and powerful, until he reveals his true identity as a member of the Istari, an order of wizards sent by the Valar, the god-like beings who rule over Middle-earth. - Making Legolas more adventurous and curious, until he decides to leave his home and explore the world, following a hint from his father about a young ranger named Aragorn. - Making Tauriel more compassionate and brave, until she defies her king and follows her heart to help the dwarves and Kili, whom she falls in love with. - Making Bard more heroic and noble, until he becomes the leader of Lake-town and the slayer of Smaug. The screenplay also uses some elements from Tolkien's


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